Friday, September 21, 2007

My motto's always been, "When it's right, it's right."

A Reforming Layman has a challenging Civics Quiz (I only scored 50/60), so I thought I'd share another quiz, one where I scored 100%.

I don't know what mammal or Simpsons character I am, but theologically I seem to be Anselm (1033-1109), the scholastic who defined theology as "faith seeking understanding."

What say you about your theological identity?


You scored as Anselm, Anselm is the outstanding theologian of the medieval period. He sees man's primary problem as having failed to render unto God what we owe him, so God becomes man in Christ and gives God what he is due. You should read 'Cur Deus Homo?'



Anselm


100%

Which theologian are you?

On a personal note, I've always appreciated Anselm's theological contribution with the necessity of the incarnation with regard to atonement. In other words, if God sets forth to redeem from among humanity, a God-man is necessary ... due to the nature of who God is.

Some had said the incarnation was necessary because that was the way God chose, but He could have chosen another way of redemption (e.g., the death of animal). Some were saying that it was only necessary since that was the plan God came up with, but He could have come up with a different plan.

Anselm said (Gunny paraphrase), "No, based on God's character, if there's going to be redemption there has to be satisfaction of His justice. Man should do it, because it's His debt. But He cannot pay it. God could do it, being infinite, but it's not His debt. But in the Christ, in the incarnation, you have one would could do it, fully God and fully man."
For God will not do it, because he has no debt to pay; and man will not do it, because he cannot. Therefore, in order that the God-man may perform this, it is necessary that the same being should perfect God and perfect man, in order to make this atonement. For he cannot and ought not to do it, unless he be very God and very man.
-from Cur Deus Homo? (Why God became Man), II.vii
None therefore can make this satisfaction except God. And none ought to make it except man. . . . If, then, it be necessary that the kingdom of heaven be completed by man's admission, and if man cannot be admitted unless the aforesaid satisfaction for sin be first made, and if God only can, and man only ought to make this satisfaction, then necessarily One must make it who is both God and man"
- Cur Deus Homo?, II.vi

17 Comments:

At 21 September, 2007 10:25, Anonymous Anonymous said...

OILCAN scored as JOHN CALVIN! Whoop! (after a 6-way tiebreaker)

You scored as a John Calvin
Much of what is now called Calvinism had more to do with his followers than Calvin himself, and so you may or may not be committed to TULIP, though God's sovereignty is all important.

Jonathan Edwards
67%
Karl Barth
67%
Friedrich Schleiermacher
67%
Anselm
67%
Martin Luther
67%
John Calvin
67%
Charles Finney
33%
Jürgen Moltmann
33%
Augustine
0%
Paul Tillich
0%

 
At 21 September, 2007 11:42, Blogger Jared Nelson said...

Aslem's Argument sounds extremely similar to Athanasius in On the Incarnation.

 
At 21 September, 2007 12:17, Blogger Matt Bradley said...

Here you go Gunny...I always knew we had something besides the Aggies in common...

Although, I think I meant something different than they did when I gave a few of my responses. I'm most pleased not to have received any points in favor of Finney, and I think that's the real value of the test, right? :^) (But how in the heck did Tillich get in the mix?)

You scored as Anselm.

Anselm
100%

Karl Barth
93%

Friedrich Schleiermacher
93%

John Calvin
67%

Paul Tillich
67%

Martin Luther
67%

Jonathan Edwards
53%

Jürgen Moltmann
13%

Augustine
0%

Charles Finney
0%

 
At 21 September, 2007 12:29, Blogger samurai said...

I scored as Anselm as well.. intresting...

Thank you for sharing this link...

I didn't do so well on the Civic's test though. 63%

 
At 21 September, 2007 12:35, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Matt,

I was hoping no one would notice my 33% Finney. I presume it was because I answered in agreement that the world needs revival, but I mean authentic God-inspired revival, and not a Finney like man-centered and man-inspired false revival.

 
At 21 September, 2007 12:37, Blogger GUNNY said...

Samurai, don't feel too bad. That Civics test was hard.

I actually had to skip more than a few and come back to them after cogitating further.

I missed 10 and I wonder if there were any guesses I got right! There were a couple where I was "Duh" after seeing the right answer, but what can you do?

Matt, let's not talk about the Aggies just yet ... that wound is still too fresh!

 
At 21 September, 2007 13:10, Blogger Timothy said...

Gunny,
I will have to come back and take this next week. I'm still in mourning.
Gig Fran!
Blessings

 
At 21 September, 2007 13:21, Anonymous Anonymous said...

OILCAN scored a 52 out of 60 on the Civics Quiz. Scoreboard Gunny! I am a better guesser than you.

 
At 21 September, 2007 14:12, Blogger M. Jay Bennett said...

Here's my score:

You scored as a Martin Luther
The daddy of the Reformation. You are opposed to any Catholic ideas of works-salvation and see the scriptures as being primarily authoritative.
Martin Luther

80%
John Calvin

67%
Karl Barth

60%
Paul Tillich

60%
Anselm

60%
Friedrich Schleiermacher

40%
Jonathan Edwards

33%
Jürgen Moltmann

27%
Augustine

20%
Charles Finney

13%

 
At 21 September, 2007 16:10, Anonymous NCguy said...

Well, I don't know how accurate this thing is. Some of these guys I've never heard of. I'm at least proud that I got 0% Finney :o)
-- NCguy
____________________

You scored as a Karl Barth
The daddy of 20th Century theology. You perceive liberal theology to be a disaster and so you insist that the revelation of Christ, not human experience, should be the starting point for all theology.
Karl Barth
80%
Martin Luther
80%
Anselm
73%
John Calvin
67%
Friedrich Schleiermacher
40%
Jonathan Edwards
33%
Jürgen Moltmann
13%
Paul Tillich
7%
Augustine
7%
Charles Finney
0%

 
At 21 September, 2007 16:16, Blogger GUNNY said...

52?! Not fair, Oilcan. You have to factor in my handicap. Don't forget I went to publik skewel.

Clearly, anything above 33% Finney puts one's orthodoxy in jeopardy.

 
At 21 September, 2007 16:17, Blogger Matt Bradley said...

Not counting the ones I got wrong, I got a 47 out of 47 on the civics test. :^) There were some tough questions on there!

 
At 21 September, 2007 20:12, Anonymous Jeremy said...

I'll refrain from the quiz on principle (the fact that people here can score > 0 for Finney helps prove my point), but do I like what you used it to segue into.

 
At 21 September, 2007 20:36, Blogger GUNNY said...

Jer,

I hope that's not some suppressed Finneyism that you're afraid will come to the surface.

Remember, a little leaven leavens the whole lump.

 
At 22 September, 2007 12:37, Blogger Kyle said...

well my friend, I too scored as Anselm.
Probably already know, but Anselm is also known for making the strongest philosophical argument for the existence of God: "There is that greater than which nothing else can be conceived."

 
At 24 September, 2007 16:23, Blogger Brotherhank said...

Gunny-

I read Anslem's "Why God Became Man" the other day, and I would like to know what you think about his belief that man was created to fill up the number of the fallen angels?

"If the angels, before any of them fell, existed in that perfect number of which we have spoken, then men were only made to supply the place of the lost angels." (XVIII)

Aparrently this was a big idea back then? I heard that Augustine wrote some on it as well...

just wondering...

off to take the quiz!

 
At 25 September, 2007 11:25, Blogger Timothy said...

Gunny,
I refuse to post the results... I will not be equated to Karl Barth!

Now, I dust off my Institutes, and bring out the Augustine for more study!
:)
Blessings

 

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